Pools

The Problem:

The pipes feeding the Hotel’s Terrace Pool and Spa were leaking, causing massive amounts of water loss. The pipes are encased in structural slabs over the roof of the hotel’s parking structure, so traditional repairs would prove costly, invasive, and extremely inconvenient for the busy hotel.

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The Problem:

The Peninsula’s pool and jacuzzi were experiencing leaks in the piping system.

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The Problem:

Clifton and Carole West live in Silver Spring, MD where she is an administrative assistant and he is the Chief Medical Technologist and CEO at B&W Stat Laboratory. After living in their Silver Spring home for over thirty years, Mr. and Mrs. West began to notice their pool slowly losing water. “Initially, I tried to fix it with duct tape,” Mr. West told us, “ after awhile my repairs weren’t working, so I called my plumber to come and fix the problem.” When the plumber arrived at their home he informed them that they had a leak in the supply line for the pool. In order to fix the leak they would have to dig up the old pipe and replace it. As the plumber and Mr. West talked about the process of re-piping the pool line, Mr. West inquired about alternative solutions. The plumber suggested they look into the ePIPE process to fix their problem. He explained that ePIPE in-place restoration wouldn’t destroy their yard, the project would be completed in half the time it would take to re-pipe, and they would save money. Mr. West found our website and called for a free estimate.

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Los Angeles Union Station (LAUS) is the main railway station in Los Angeles and the largest railroad passenger terminal in the Western United States. It opened in May 1939 as the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal. Union Station became known as the "Last of the Great Railway Stations" built in the United States. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. California High-Speed Rail - Union Station is planned to be a major hub for the future California High-Speed Rail System.

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The Problem:

Clifton and Carole West live in Silver Spring, MD where she is an administrative assistant and he is the Chief Medical Technologist and CEO at B&W Stat Laboratory. After living in their Silver Spring home for over thirty years, Mr. and Mrs. West began to notice their pool slowly losing water. “Initially, I tried to fix it with duct tape,” Mr. West told us, “ after awhile my repairs weren’t working, so I called my plumber to come and fix the problem.” When the plumber arrived at their home he informed them that they had a leak in the supply line for the pool. In order to fix the leak they would have to dig up the old pipe and replace it.

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The Problem:

A leak from an indoor pool at a home in South Kensington, London was creating significant water loss and considerable cost to the customer in water bills as well as heating, maintenance and water treatment chemicals.

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The Problem:

Previously identified leak on 2”ID skimmer line to plant room. An estimated 5000 litres of water was being lost every day, through at least one leak. Not only was the lost water costing the home owner, but they were also faced with additional heating and pool maintenance costs. Conventional repair of the leak would have meant tearing up quality internal finishes in the pool area, at considerable cost and inconvenience, to replace or repair the faulty pipe.

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The Problem:

With an estimated water loss of 3500 litres per day through leaking pipes, the cost of maintaining the pool was forcing the owner to shut it down during one of the hottest English summers on record. Even worse the traditional dig and fix option was uneconomical and would have resulted in the pool still being out of service well into the autumn.

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The Problem:

Extensive renovations were performed on the chapelapproximately four years ago, resulting in a leak on the a/ccondensate line. This leak caused water damage to the custom-plastered wall finish. Replacement of the pipe within the wallswas cost prohibitive and would seriously interrupt the meditationof the visiting patrons.

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The Problem:

Just four weeks after construction was complete, the church began experiencing problems with air bubbles in the baptismal. The re-circulation line had a water leak under the foundation. Replacing the lines using standard pipe replacement in this several-million dollar building would require through-the-slab tear out and weeks of reconstruction.

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